9 TIPS TO SURVIVE A BRIDAL SHOW

HELP TIPS FOR BRIDES1. Dress cute n comfy – if going with a team; match the wardrobe or colors. Wear your cute club veil so we all know your the Bride. You know you have one. LoL 

2. Eat before and maybe if you know you will turn into Monique bring crackers and water.

3. BYOB – Bring your own Bag – thou you get one, it will break with all the papers. One for keepers and one for no’s.

4. BYC – Bring your checkbook. They will have some amazing deals you can only get there.

5. Do your homework, see who’s going and know their prices in advance to getting those deals. Just because they have a booth doesn’t mean they have a good rep. Anyone can buy a booth.

6. Plan the day. Plan where to park, what time it starts and map out the booths you want to see first and then see the rest.

7. Print out stickers of your name, email, dates of wedding, address and phone. You just saved yourself lots of time and don’t have to fill out any prize raffles.

8. Find and Collect the Open House flyers. These are what all the venues will give you so you can map out your next month of tours.

9. If you already have a venue; know what is not exclusive so you don’t book a vendor that you really can’t use.  
HAVE FUN!
One Bride suggested creating a separate email just for Bridal Emails.

NEW YEAR BRINGS NEW ENGAGEMENTS

Happy 2017 New Year!  With the new year brings new Engagements.


If you’re one of the lucky couples that just got engaged congratulations!  

Your first step is to decide on a date.  Dates can be anniversaries of when you met, they can also be around holidays when family can travel, or they can be seasonal the best time to have a wedding.

Your second step is to decide on who you’re going to invite, so you’ll have an estimate of guests count. 

Once you have a budget, you will have that you’re third step is to find a venue that has your date.  

Most Brides ask Venues for packages and dates from venues in advance of touring.  Once you find a few you like then it’s the time for touring and making your decision.
We hope that when looking you keep our hidden gem in mind at BindersGardens.com.


Things to remember when picking your venue.

1. Think of how you felt walking around.  This is how your guest will feel attending your weddings.

2. Ask 3 questions; Who will be at my wedding to help me on issues? What are your restrictions?  What is the maximum number allowed at the venue?

3. Request to view a sample invoice so you can see hidden costs.

4. Observe wheather the person touring with is truely listening to your questions.

5. Ask if there are options in prices.

6. Ask questions that will determine if they can handle conflicts the day of your wedding with your family.

7. Communicate to see if they are flexible about your priorities like decor or dealing with handicap family.

Once you get that comfort zone establiblish then this will help you decide if the venue is your perfect fit.  

The Dress: After The Wedding Options.


What to Do With the Dress After Your Wedding?
Many women struggle with what to do with their wedding gowns.

The average dress costs more than $1,300 in the U.S., a significant amount of money to spend on something you’ll only wear once.


Chances are, your wedding dress was something that you fell madly in love with the minute you tried it on for the first time. It was probably something you had to dig deep into your savings account to afford and will forever be the most expensive thing hanging in your closet. It’s definitely one of the top things you will remember when you look back at your wedding memories. But as hard as it is, selling your white dress for some cold hard cash may be the right option for you. 


How Much Money You Can List it For?

You may have paid a couple thousand dollars for your wedding dress, and while you won’t make all of that money back selling it used, you can make up to 50 percent back if you sell it within two and a half years. Depending on the style, fabric, designer name, and condition, you could make quite a lot of your money back selling it second hand.

Before putting the dress up for sale, make sure you are ready to say goodbye to it. Some people hold on to their wedding dress for sentimental reasons or because they have hopes of one day giving the dress to a relative. Just make sure you are ready to trade it in for money before selling it.

How Quick It Sells Can Be Based on What You Do.

Keep the dress in good shape after your wedding by getting it professionally cleaned. If it’s in good shape you’ll have a better chance of selling it. Try to sell it within a couple of years, so that the style is still popular and well sought after.


If you don’t know what to do with yours, consider these options:

Preserve It:

While preserving the dress wasn’t for me, many brides opt for this traditional approach.

Depending on the dress and your chosen method of preservation, the cost can range anywhere from $200 to $800.

Some brides open the box on a milestone date, such as their 10th, 15th or 25th anniversary.  


Pass It Down:

If you intend to have children — or have siblings with children — you can hold onto the dress and pass it on when the kids are ready to get married.

While your daughter or niece may not want to wear the dress as-is, she can alter it or use a piece of it to make her veil. It can be a nice way to add the “something old” to the wedding.

Frame It:

Some brides remove the bodice of the dress and frame it in a shadow box with other mementos from the wedding, like your invitation or place cards.

You can have it done professionally, but it’s also an easy DIY project. When I looked up the materials needed to follow this tutorial, the total cost was less than $100.


Sell It:

Where You Should Go to Sell It ?
There are plenty of online stores that specialize in re-selling wedding dresses like preownedweddingdresses.com, as well as eBay, tradesy, and for those more daring, Craigslist. If you’d feel better selling it to a brick and mortar shop, you can find local consignment shops to sell it at. Or get only 50 percent of the sale at Merry Go Round.

Dresses on eBay usually sell for lower prices, but Tradesy specializes in higher-end items, so you’ll get more money. It’s free to list, but they do take a 9% commission.

You can also look for bridal consignment shops in your area. They’ll handle selling the dress and you’ll get a portion of the purchase price.

Depending on the make of the dress, you can sell it for anywhere from 30-70% of its original cost. At the same time, you’ll be helping another bride get her dream dress.


Donate It:

Many charities accept wedding dresses, and they’re tax-deductible donations.

Here are four great options to consider supporting:

Adorned in Grace: Sells dresses to raise money to support victims of human trafficking

Make a Wish: Provides gowns to terminally ill brides who want to get married

Everyone’s Dream Come True: Gives dresses to brides in need so they can have a beautiful gown for their wedding

Angel Gowns: Creates bereavement gowns for babies that don’t get to come home from the hospital


Trash It:

If the idea of wearing it just once makes you sad, you could consider a “trash the dress” photo shoot.

Many brides wear their dresses to have pictures taken at the beach or in the countryside. The dress will likely be ruined, but you’ll have beautiful and special photos to remember it by.

There’s no right or wrong way to handle your dress after the big day. It’s an intensely personal decision.

Photos Published by Binders Gardens Venue

BindersGardens.com

Brides who have already had their wedding were asked; What are some things you regret doing / not doing in your big day?

    Texas Brides were asked what would did they regret not doing or doing on their big day in a FaceBook group for Brides to Brides.

    Smiled more!!! I was sooo happy and we had our perfect wedding but for some reason I look so serious in my photos, so put your smile one no matter what happens!!

      I regret not having a better photographer!

      Have a quick snack between ‘I Do’ and pics. It was almost a BRIDE DOWN situation. Thankfully granny saved me with some ritz crackers in her purse.

      Oh and I didn’t eat all day I didn’t even eat at the reception Because by the time we had the reception I was sick to my stomach and couldn’t eat at all nearly passed out..

        Not smiling , and the drizzle of rain had something to do with it . My photographer had to keep reminding me to smile ….So if you can Smile . Lol

          Have fun and let everyone do thier jobs assigned to them
          :).

            Not having a day of coordinator!

              Not eating, some how the entire night went by and I don’t think I ever sat down.

               I regret not having video! The day of you are so caught up in the emotions and excitement that everything becomes a blur. Not to mention it goes by soooooo quickly. I wish we had a videographer to capture the day so we could look back on it years to come!!!! 

              I’m so glad we had was a photo booth though that had video capability so we can see everyone’s “wedding wishes” 💗

                Have a plan for your bouquet – preserving somehow?
                We DIY DJ’d…big mistake.
                Wish we’d have rented linens and a dance floor to pretty it up to its potential.

                  Less people- I had 140. And felt like I didn’t get to spend quality time w everyone there. Sure I made sure to stop by every table and say hello (which took forever). But I wanted more time w maybe 1/2 the people that were there.

                    Oh, and more cake!! Def get more portions than the # of people you invite. My cake was amazing (shout out to Bavarian Cakery) and I wanted more! Too bad for me- it was gone.

                      Take alone time with just your husband before you go to the reception. Not drinking enough. A day of coordinator. Let go of any worries and stress just enjoy it. And have everything packed before hand we got back to our apartment and still had to pack for our cruise before we left the next day.

                      Drinking scotch before the wedding lol

                      Ok, so with our RSVPs trickling in, I want to help others avoid a mistake I made. I did address and stamp the envelopes for the RSVPs, but I did not put the return addresses on the envelopes for them. You know… the guests address… well neither did any of them. Now we’re hunting down who sent what. A friend suggested that we should have numbered the RSVP cards and kept a corresponding list. This way, return address or not, we know which card came from whom. Too late for our cluster $#@!, but maybe it’s not too late for some of you lol!

                      Thanks for reading.

                      From BindersGardens.com

                      Come Take a tour soon.

                      The Binders

                      5 Big Mistakes Wedding Professionals Make on Facebook

                      How to use Facebook for your wedding business


                      When I asked the wedding professionals on our email list for their biggest questions about using social media for their wedding businesses, the response was overwhelming! And most of the questions that came in had to do with Facebook.
                      My Confession
                      I’m on Facebook. I use it personally and professionally. But I have to confess…
                      I haven’t done everything on Facebook for our wedding business that I know I should be doing.
                      So this was a wake up call for me, too. I may not know everything there is to know about Facebook, but I’m really, really good at figuring stuff out.
                      Before we can get into exactly what to put on your Page and how to get brides on it, we’ve got to make sure we’re avoiding the most common…and sometimes disastrous…Facebook mistakes.
                      5 Facebook Business Mistakes
                      Mistake #1 – Using a Personal Profile For Your Wedding Business.
                      If you set up a new Facebook profile using your business name, you are in direct violation of Facebook’s terms of service.
                      Facebook only allows ONE profile for each individual. You are not permitted to use it, “for your own commercial gain.” If you want to promote your business, you need to create a Facebook Page.
                      If Facebook finds a profile used for a business, that account will be deleted and will lose all its friends and account information.
                      I know, it sucks. One of my wedding professional Facebook friends set up a profile using the name of their business and had over 1,500 friends. When Facebook found out, her account was deleted and she lost all those connections.
                      Yes, you will find people out there who are violating this rule, but it simply isn’t worth the risk. Use a Facebook Page for your business and save your profile for the “real” you.
                      Mistake #2 – Not Using Keywords in the Page Title and Description.
                      The cool thing about Facebook pages is that they get indexed in the search engines. If you set it up right, this means that your Facebook page could end up on Page 1 of Google.
                      However, this will only happen if you set up the page properly.
                      Use your targeted keywords (“san francisco wedding planner,” “dallas wedding photographer”) in your Page’s title and description. This will give you more visibility and get more brides to your Page and your website.
                      Mistake #3 – Not Including a Link to Your Website.
                      This seems like a no-brainer, but so many wedding professionals FORGET to put an easy to find link to their website on their business Page.
                      All your efforts are wasted if you don’t make it easy for brides to contact you and learn more about your business.
                      Make sure you add a link in the About section under your image as well as on your information tab. Use the full url…that means http://www.YourWebsite Dot com…

                      Then click it to make sure it works when you’re done!
                      Mistake #4 – Promoting, Promoting and Only Promoting.
                      If you want brides to “like” your page, pay attention to your status updates, and come back for more, you’ve got to make your updates interesting and valuable to them.
                      Many wedding vendors promote their own services, products and sales with every update. It’s like a never-ending sales pitch and it drives brides away! If all you do is tell them how great you are, they’ll hit that little “ignore” button and you’ll disappear from their Facebook world forever.
                      Make sure your updates are fun, interesting and helpful for brides. Then you can sparingly sprinkle in a promotion now and then.
                      Mistake #5 – Spamming the Walls of Friends With Ads.
                      Plastering your advertisement on every one of your friend’s Walls WILL NOT get you business. It will earn you a reputation as a “spammer,” your friends will un-friend you or make you invisible, and brides will be completely turned off.
                      People hang out on Facebook to connect with other people. That doesn’t mean you can’t use it to make money for your business…you sure can!…but you do it by building a relationship first.
                      If you want to advertise, buy a Facebook ad. Don’t use your friends’ profiles. 


                      Visit BindersGardens.com

                      WHY WEDDING INSURANCE?

                      Many have not heard of event insurance, but it is an important part of wedding planning. This may sound like an extra cost or extra headache, but event insurance is the exact opposite.

                      Wedding / Special Event Liability Insurance is a specialty insurance policy designed to protect and reimburse the named insured and/or Bride and Groom from certain types of claims and losses arising from accidents taking place during the wedding, reception, and rehearsal. Subject to the specific coverage terms, conditions and exclusions, wedding liability coverage can offer protection for the wedding couple if they are found liable for things such as damage to the facility caused by a guest or vendor, bodily injury to guests or even alcohol-related accidents. ( Wedsafe.com )

                      Event insurance helps cover the cost of any unforeseen events that could take place. For example, in the case of having to delay a wedding a few days or even cancel the wedding, there is wedding cancellation insurance can cover the cost of the deposits. You could also have vendor mishaps that can cause loss or damage. Wedding liability insurance would cover the cost.
                      Event insurance is not just for weddings, but for other events as well including parties, bar & bat mitzvahs, quinceaneras, and business events. Your event is not just an event, but an investment that takes time and money. Event insurance can help cover that investment monetarily in case something should go wrong.
                        Two sites you can investigate event insurance more Wedsafe.com and http://www.privateeventinsurance.com.


                      Wedding Insurance 101
                      Although it certainly isn’t the most pleasant thing to think about it, unexpected accidents and disasters do have the potential to strike on your big day. Your wedding is meant to be one of the most memorable experiences of your life—and definitely one of the most significant milestones—so how can you protect your special event against unfortunate incidents?


                      With wedding season quickly approaching it’s time that couples educated themselves on the available coverage options created to help safeguard your special event. Keep in mind that each couple and each wedding is extremely unique, so customizing the perfect wedding insurance package that meets your personalized needs is very important. Educate yourself on the available insurance coverages to ensure your wedding is properly protected:

                      1. Common wedding policies will provide coverage for the site of the ceremony and reception by mediating the cost of an unavoidable cancellation – such as damage or inaccessibility to the venue.
                      2. If severe weather conditions prevent the bride and groom, or other major family members, from being present at the ceremony – or result in cancellation all together – wedding insurance can cover rescheduling and all the details involved.
                      3. Vendor no-show can also be covered in a wedding insurance policy. If the caterer or officiate fail to show up, a wedding insurance policy typically covers cancellation or postponement.
                      4. Wedding insurance may also include coverage if sickness or injury to the bride, groom or another essential wedding party member is unable to make the special event.
                      Most often, weddings tend to be expensive events. Believe it or not, the average wedding still tops the $30,000 mark—and with a hefty investment of that size, many are quick to secure special coverages and protection for this truly special event.

                      WEDDING VENUE QUESTIONS TO ASK


                      Not all wedding Venues are the same, so when comparing Venues; don’t just look at price. Compare Apples to Apple and not Oranges to Apples when looking for a Venue.  

                      Selecting a wedding venue is one of the earliest, and most important tasks on your to-do list. If you’ve never planned a wedding before, how can you be sure of the questions you’ll need to ask to find the perfect venue?

                      There are specific questions to ask when looking for a venue.

                      *What is not included in my rental of the venue, what extra charges or deposits are needed for their wedding package?

                      Ask if Chairs, tables, linen will be included in your rental package.  It’s not always provided.  Ask if any other items will be require to rent to have a wedding ceremony and reception.  Ask what details are extras perks sort of their package.


                      *What if something happens?

                      All weddings need a plan B and what if plan.  Outdoor wedding venues know that it could rain and they will tell you want they do or you should do.  Do you need insurance?  What if the Electricity goes out?  No one ever thinks to ask this.  If you have insurance what is covered to protect you if that would if happens. If the venue has plan Bs in place, and they have the answers for the would if; then you are in good hands.


                      *Should I tip anyone or this also a hidden cost?

                      The norm is to tip servers and come prepared to tip them. Bartenders usually have a tip jar but they also hire extra servers to help if the event is large. It’s best to ask your vendors if the tips are included in their cost. You need to know these things in advance.


                      *Ask for Exclusive price?

                      If your Venue only gives a price for Tables and Chairs, ask if they will give you an exclusive price on everything from cake, photos, Flowers, DJ and Catering. Sometime they can get the price better.


                      *Ask if there is a separate cost for a Cake?

                      In my experience, no one has a plan for who is responsible in cutting the cake. If you want the venue to be responsible to cutting the cake, serving it, providing cake plates and forks; their might be an extra fee. If not, then make sure you prepare in advance if Aunt June is cutting the cake and if she knows how correctly. Then make sure you have cake plates and extra forks. Don’t forget the Cake Cutter Knife and Cake Server.

                      *Ask how long you can Dance?

                      If you have hopes of drinking and dancing from dawn til dusk at your wedding you might want to ask if you can do that. Some venues only allow on an average four hours of Reception time. Some let you go over for an extra fee. Vendors and Venues basis their fees on four hours of Reception time and that is what they pay their staff for. So if you go over that basis set time frame, you might get sent an extra bill. Some will let you stay without the bar and music. Find out for your records. Even the Photographer is only expecting a certain time frame to be there and they might extra for the longer party.


                      *Ask about rules on decorating?

                      If you have big plans of having a hundred candles, fireworks, balloon, lanterns, hanging chandeliers and hanging material from the ceiling, they might get tarnished with a pop of a balloon. Many venues have strict policies against nails, tape, staplers, fire, and open flames. Find out in advance and if there is a fee to have them. A garden that has regular beauty may need no extra decorating to set the tone of your wedding. You can ask if there is a small fee to use any centerpieces and plants or arbors they have available for your event.


                      *Ask for the fee of the next day and if they schedule other events on the same day?

                      Large Venue may have several small weddings at the same venue to meet the demand. Find out if you can block off the night before to have your rehearsal and dinner at the same location. Sometimes they offer it for a small fee. It’s best not to have your wedding at the same time to not get parties confused to where to attend. Ask if you can schedule cocktail hour and what is the extra fee in between your ceremony and reception. 


                      *Ask if there is bathrooms and parking for your guests.

                      Many sites have a fee for parking and many times you can arrange for valet parking for an additional expense. This does help things run smoother than if people have to struggle to park and walk to the event. You could have a party bus pick up your out of town guest and shuttle them to the event in one pickup.


                      There are many factors and fees to consider when booking a venue, contact us at info@BindersGardens.com to get started with a tour.
                       

                      WEDDING COORDINATOR/PLANNER .. VS .. VENUE COORDINATOR

                      All Coordinators are not equal and you should know the difference before thinking you don’t need a wedding Coordinator.  


                      We’ve heard it SO many times- “Oh the venue coordinator will handle everything, I don’t need a wedding planner/coordinator.”


                      We might need to clarify what they will do and what is not expected from them.

                      What most brides don’t quite understand is that the venue coordinator is just there for the Venue standpoint and manage help where needed. 


                      Nothing against venue coordinators, but they are there to facilitate who and what comes in and out.  If they tell you they can handle things on the day of your wedding, it’s true- they can, but it’s only within a certain scope.


                      A venue coordinator is looking out for the best interest of the venue. A wedding coordinator looks out for the best interest of YOU, the bride. The venue coordinator deals with everything having to do with the venue- food, setup, etc. A wedding coordinator will deal with aspects of the venue, such as setup, and will make sure everything is to your specifications. 


                      If your ceremony is at a location other than the venue, your wedding coordinator will be there with you. A venue coordinator will not be at that offsite ceremony. If the ceremony is at the venue, the venue coordinator will be there to help with the coordination of the ceremony.


                       A wedding coordinator stays by your side throughout the day and night. They are there to tell you when things will be occurring throughout the night, such as the cake cutting, bouquet toss, toasts, etc. When I was planning, I stayed until the very end of the wedding, until all of the guests were gone. A venue coordinator stays until the meal is served, and the majority of the time, leaves after. Some may stay until the cake is cut and served. He or she will not be by your side throughout the day or night. Although the venue coordinator will do their best to keep you happy, he or she likely will not be involved if your bustle breaks, when it comes time to load up your gifts, or tracking down your lipgloss. 


                       A wedding coordinator contacts your vendors before your wedding to make sure everyone is confirmed and knows what time they will be arriving. A venue coordinator may contact vendors that have to do with setup of the reception, but it’s not common. Other vendors, like your photographer or hair and makeup, would not be contacted by your venue coordinator.

                       Venues are known to have a high turnover rate among the coordinator/sales positions. The person that you book your wedding with may or may not still be there when it comes time for your wedding a year, year and a half later. Your wedding coordinator is hired by YOU, hand selected by YOU, and won’t be going anywhere (unless, God forbid, something horrible happens!).  

                      These are just a few things to inspire some thinking when it comes to deciding whether or not you need a wedding coordinator. This is in no way meant to be bad towards venue coordinators… as I said before, I LOVE venue coordinators- it’s always awesome to work with them! I just want you all to be aware of the differences between the two so you can make the best decision!

                      7 BOLD WAYS TO SAVE ON YOUR WEDDING COST

                        Here are seven daring ways to save you hundreds and thousands of dollars when planning your wedding. Dare to break the chain and make your own traditions. Even thou the normal is to follow what the Wedding Planners and Vendors, it’s your party and celebration; own it. These are just ideas and not for everyone. It usually cost 70$ to 100$ a guest to have a wedding. Here are seven ways to make it less per guest and save hundreds.

                        
                      1. Book an off day at your Venue. Sometimes Friday and Sundays have lower prices when the Saturday is already booked at that Venue. Also have a lunch or Brunch instead of a five course Dinner meal.

                        2. Paperless Invitations – people respond faster and quicker with Evite or an electronic Invitation. People always lose them with their overdue bills pile they get in the mail. Join the twentieth century and make it electronic. Opt out the Sign-in book too and bring a canvas where your wedding photo will go and have them sign it.

                        3. Fund Account for Honeymoon – Opt out of gifts or registries and use the money to take your three week Honeymoon to where you want to go.

                        4. No Flowers or Cake – use lace or synthetic bouquet with stones to make it shine and keep it forever. Have a Craft day with your bridesmaids and make your own amazing arrangement to use and keep forever. Also have decorative cupcakes instead of a cake or opt for small wedding cake with cupcakes for guests. If you want real flowers tell the Florist what your budget is and they will make it happen.

                        5. Plan your own wedding, Planners want 10% of your total cost and with more apps and family members, you can do it all yourself when saving. Stay off Pinterest or you will add up a new expense of wants. Join the Facebook Groups and attend a Wedding Swap event to help recycle items. Stick to your budget and tell everyone what you need. Buy in Bulk if possible. A great DJ will help you with your timeline and get a good photographer that has a partner and they has consistent work. Officiants are ordained for free on line so have your public speaking friend get a license.

                        6. Sample or Rented Wedding Dresses are just as amazing as new designer name brand wedding dresses. Go to the big name brand shops first and get a feel of what type of dress looks amazing on your body and then go to the ones that offer Samples or Rentals. The saving is amazing. Also have your bridesmaids and grooms wear what they have. Black – everyone has a black dress and black suit. Just tie them together with pearls and the same tie and your saving for all.

                        7. BYOB – Just have them bring their own Bottle and turn it in to the bartender with their name on.

                       

                      Need a venue? Houston Wedding Blog is sponsored by a new Venue “Binders Gardens Venue” the new Shabby Chic Outdoor Wedding Venue within outer City Limits of Houston. Find them at BindersGardens.com

                        
                       

                      Wedding Vendor Tipping Cheat Sheet

                      Wedding Vendor Tipping Cheat Sheet

                        
                      With so many wedding expenses, gratuities can add up. Here are the wedding vendors you need to tip.
                      When you’re already dipping deep into your (or your parents’) savings for so many wedding expenses, allotting room in your budget for gratuities on top of that can be hard to handle. And even though service charges may be spelled out in your contract, tipping—although not mandatory—is always appreciated for a job well done, not to mention a kind and thoughtful gesture.
                      Since some vendors will expect a gratuity and other gratuities will need to be considered on a case-by-case scenario, there are a few things to consider.
                      Traditionally, business owners of larger companies don’t get tipped—just their employees—but you can/should tip an owner when the service exceeds expectations. Small business owners should never be overlooked either, since their businesses are often run by just one person.
                      Tip vendors who offer exceptional service; thank-you notes are always appreciated; and assign the responsibility to a trusted deputy such as your wedding planner, a parent or the best man. For a breakdown of what’s customary for each vendor, read on.
                          
                      Wedding Planner
                      Wedding planners won’t likely expect anything; however, if yours did a great job you can always offer a token of your appreciation. (Note: Non-monetary thank-yous like professional photos of the wedding for the planner’s portfolio can go a long way too.) Approximately 50 percent of couples do tip their planners—typically those with more opulent weddings.
                      Protocol: Optional
                      The standard: Up to $500, or a nice gift
                      When to Tip: The bride should hand off the envelope at the end of the reception, or, she should send a thank-you note with photos or a check after the honeymoon.
                          
                      Wedding Hair Stylist and Makeup Artist
                      This is one area where a gratuity is definitely expected. Tip between 15 – 20 percent just as you would in a hair salon, and consider giving a little extra if there’s a crisis, like one of your bridesmaids has a meltdown over her hair updo and it requires a redo at the last minute.
                      Protocol: Expected
                      The standard: 15 – 25 percent, depending upon the quality of service
                      When to Tip: At the end of your service
                          
                      Wedding Delivery and Set-up Staff
                      Slip a few dollars to anyone delivering important items to the site (wedding cake , flowers, or sound system). And if a lot of gear needs to be brought in and set up (tents, chairs, or port-a-potties), the workers deserve a tip too.
                      Protocol: Expected
                      The standard: $5 – $10 per person
                      When to Tip: Drop off cash envelopes the day before the wedding to the catering manager so the person accepting deliveries can turn the tip.
                          
                      Wedding Ceremony Officiant
                      If your officiant is affiliated with a church or synagogue, you’re often expected to make a donation to that institution. If you’re a member you’ll probably want to give a larger amount than if you’re not. However, if you’re getting married there and they’re charging you to use the space, feel free to give a smaller amount. Tipping the officiant, both nondenominational and denominational, is also appreciated.
                      Protocol: Expected (depending on officiant)
                      The standard: Donate $500+ to the church or synagogue, and for the officiant, an optional tip of $50 – $100
                      When to Tip: Most ceremony fees are required prior to the wedding. Otherwise, have the best man pass the cash envelope at the rehearsal dinner if the officiant is in attendance.
                          
                      Wedding Ceremony Musicians
                      If you worked with a mini orchestra to come up with the perfect score for your service (and they pulled it off flawlessly), consider showing some monetary thanks for their talent. However, you probably don’t have to tip the solo church organist who was required to play.
                      Protocol: Optional
                      The standard: $15 – $20 per musician
                      When to Tip: At the end of the ceremony.
                       
                      Wedding Photographer/Videographer
                      You’re not expected to give your shutterbugs any dough beyond their normal fees. Yet if the wedding photographer or videographer doesn’t own the studio, consider tipping each person (or give a certain amount with a thank-you note to disperse to staff).
                      Protocol: Optional
                      The standard: $50 – $200 per vendor
                      When to Tip: At the end of the reception.
                       
                      Wedding Reception Staff
                      This type of staff includes the on-site coordinator, maitre d’, and banquet manager. A service charge (typically 2 percent) is almost always built in to the food and drink fee, so check your contract. If the gratuity is not included, tip as follows.
                      Protocol: Expected
                      The standard: 15 – 20 percent of the food and drink fee (based on labor, not the cost), or $200 – $300 for the maitre d’.
                      When to Tip: If it’s covered in the contract, the final bill is typically due before the reception. Otherwise, have the father of the bride or best man hand the envelope to the maitre d’ at the end of the reception since you will need to know the final tab to calculate the percentage.
                       
                      Wedding Reception Attendants
                      When it comes to bartenders, waitstaff, parking, bathroom, and coat-room attendants the rules of tipping are dictated by your contract. If the service fee is included, consider doling out extra only if the service was exceptional. If it’s not included, ask ahead of time how many attendants will be working your wedding and calculate on a per person basis.
                      Protocol: Optional, based on contract
                      The standard: $20 – $25 per bartender or waiter; $1 per guest for coat room and parking attendants; $1 per car
                      When to Tip: Although tips are traditionally passed out at the end of the event, you could alternately distribute them at the beginning of the evening, to encourage all the workers to give you great service.
                       
                      Wedding Reception Band or DJ
                      Whether you hire 12-piece swing band or grooving to a DJ, tipping musicians is completely optional. (Depending on the quality of the job and how willing they were to follow your ideal playlist!) And don’t forget about any sound technicians they bring with them.
                      Protocol: Optional, yet preferred
                      The standard: $20 – $25 per musician; $50 – $150 for DJs
                      When to Tip: At the end of the reception, by the best man.
                       
                      Wedding Transportation
                      Again, check your contract, as gratuity is usually included. If it isn’t, plan to tip provided they show up on time and don’t get lost!
                      Protocol: Expected
                      The standard: 15 – 20 percent of the total bill
                      When to Tip: At the end of the night or after the last ride. If you used a separate company for the guest buses, designate a bus captain to hand the driver a tip, otherwise, this duty falls to the best man.